High Level Dialogue on Forest and the SDGs, Monday, 18 July 2016, 15:00 – 17:00 Room: Red Room

During the COFO23. Session a High Level Dialogue on Forest and SDGs from 15:00 to 17:00 at Red Room. Together with the Distinguieshed Panelist listed below, I will be there to represent European Forestry Commission.

For video record: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TMD6IGbLb_A&feature=youtu.be

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  1. Mr Matt Frei, Presenter, Channel 4 News
  2. The Honourable Prof. Judi Wakhungu, Cabinet Secretary (Minister), Ministry of Environment, Water and Natural Resources, Kenya
  3. Hon Susil Premajayantha,Senior Cabinet Minister and former Minister of Environment and Renewable Energy
  4. Ms Fabiola Muñoz Dodero, Executive Director, National Forest and Wildlife Service, Peru
  5. Mr Glenn Mason, Assistant Deputy Minister, Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service
  6. Ms Maria Helena M.Q. Semedo, Deputy Director-General / Coordinator for Natural Resources, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

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European Forestry Commission

Created in 1947, the European Forestry Commission (EFC) is one of six Regional Forestry Commissions established by FAO to provide a policy and technical forum for countries to discuss and address forest issues on a regional basis. It meets every two years.

The EFC has a number of associated subsidiary bodies, including the Working Party on the Management of Mountain Watersheds; the UNECE/FAO Working Party on Forest Statistics, Economics and Management; and seven UNECE/FAO Teams of Specialists.

FAO encourages wide participation of government officials from forestry and other sectors as well as representatives of international, regional and subregional organizations that deal with forest-related issues in the region, including NGOs, and the private sector.

http://www.fao.org/forestry/efc/en/

European Forestry Commission has 40 members from Russian Federation to United Kingdom and from Norway to Malta. Most of its members are also member of Forest Europe and some of them are member of Near East Forestry and Range Commission and the Committee on Mediterranean Forestry Questions-Silva Mediterrenea.

  • Albania
  • Austria
  • Belarus
  • Belgium
  • Bulgaria
  • Croatia
  • Cyprus
  • Czech Republic
  • Denmark
  • Estonia
  • European Union (Member Organization)
  • Finland
  • France
  • Germany
  • Greece
  • Hungary
  • Iceland
  • Ireland
  • Israel
  • Italy
  • Latvia
  • Lithuania
  • Luxembourg
  • Malta
  • Netherlands
  • Norway
  • Poland
  • Portugal
  • Romania
  • Russian Federation
  • Slovakia
  • Slovenia
  • Spain
  • Sweden
  • Switzerland
  • The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia
  • Turkey
  • Ukraine
  • United Kingdom
  • Uzbekistan

High Level Dialogue on Forest and the SDGs

BRIEFING NOTE FOR THE PANELISTS

Time: Monday, 18 July 2016, 15:00 – 17:00

Room: Red Room

 

İçindekiler Tablosu

Background.. 1

Objectives and focus of the Dialogue. 1

Setup of the session.. 1

Draft Program… 2

Panelists. 2

Question 1: Experiences: 3

Question 2: Vision on the way forward towards sustainability: 4

16:55:  Closing remarks (ADG, René Castro). 6

Annex: Panelist’s bio: 6

1.    The Honourable Prof. Judi Wangalwa Wakhungu.. 6

2.    Hon Susil Premajayantha. 7

3.    Ms Fabiola Munoz Dodero.. 8

4.    Mr İsmail Belen, 8

5.    Mr Glenn Mason.. 8

 

 

 

Background

The new global framework for sustainable development: “Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development” is universal, inclusive and comprehensive, with perspectives and responsibilities reflecting the priorities and needs of all countries. The new agenda includes 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and 169 targets, which are to be achieved in the next 15 years. The different goals and targets are strongly inter-dependent, aiming at a balance of different dimensions of sustainability.

The central role of agriculture, forestry and fisheries to achieve key goals of the SDGs is now widely accepted. The SDGs and the 2030 Agenda, with their extensive and detailed attention to agriculture, biodiversity, fisheries, forests, land, soils, and water, present a potentially unique window of opportunity for a stronger role in shaping national development trajectories. For this to happen, transformation envisaged by member states at the global level needs to be set in motion nationally within each country. National leaders are expected to look at the role of agriculture, forestry and fisheries in a new way, launching a process of transformation at national levels that is owned and led by national governments and their partners and key stakeholders.

The High Level Dialogue on Forests and the SDGs responds to the recommendation of the COFO Steering Committee for such a dialogue session.

 

Objectives and focus of the Dialogue

 The High Level Dialogue on forests and SDGs should set the scene for COFO’s deliberations on key opportunities and challenges to strengthen the contribution of forests to the SDG’s. It should also provide a strategic view on how to better contribute to the SDGs by joining forces with agriculture and fishery.

 

Setup of the session

The session will be an open, interactive dialogue focusing on two questions related to the topic.  The session aims to create a forum for joint enquiry and discussion between members of the High Level Panel and the audience around two key questions:

 Q1:    Experiences: key challenges to strengthen the contribution of forests to the SDGs in a coherent and effective way jointly with agricultural and fisheries sectors

Q2:    Vision on the way forward towards sustainability: potential for and actions needed to lead transformative change jointly with agriculture and fisheries in support of implementing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

 On stage six chairs will be set up, plus one for the moderator. Panelists will wired before the session in the backstage room adjunct to the red room, then they will be seated on stage in chairs. Moderator and panelists have wireless microphones. The Session will be filmed and available on the event webpage the next day.

 

Draft Program

 14.30:  Meeting in Red Room before the stage to jointly move room adjunct to Red Room for briefing with panelists and wiring of microphones. [Any regional/country specification on questions to panelists will need to be brought up by panelists at the latest at this stage, see below].

 15:00:  Opening address by the Director General of FAO, Mr José Graziano da Silva

[moderator to announce start of the session, self-introduction, announce opening by DG]

 15:10:  Introduction of participants

[moderator to introduce topic and panelists briefly]

 

Topic: see background and objective of the session.

 

Panelists

This panel is composed of ministers or vice-ministers responsible for forests, or their representatives, from the countries giving the chairpersons of the Regional Forestry Commissions. Panelists could provide their own vision and the vision of the regions on the importance of and the links between forest and SDGs, and in joining forces with agriculture and fisheries to promote sustainability in the context of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Short bios, as available, are in the annex.

 

  • H.E. the Minister for Environment, Water and Natural Resources, Kenya: Prof. Judi Wangalwa Wakhungu Cabinet Secretary, for the African Forestry and Wildlife Commission region
  • Hon. Susil Premajayantha , Senior Cabinet Minister and former Minister of Environment and Renewable Energy, Sri Lanka, for the Asia Pacific Forestry Commission region
  • Mr Ismail Belen, Chief Advisor to the  Minister for Environment and Forestry, Turkey for the European Forestry Commission region
  • Mrs Fabiola Muñoz Dodero, the Executive Director of Peru National Forest and Wildlife Service (SERFOR) for the Latin American and Caribbean Forestry Commission region
  • H.E. the Minister, Agriculture, Rural Development and Fisheries, Algeria (TBC), for Near East Forestry and Range Commission region
  • H.E. the Deputy Assistant Minister Glenn Mason, Natural Resources, Canada for the North American Forest Commission region

 

Please note:

The use of PowerPoint presentations will not be possible. Questions might be adjusted slightly according to your needs prior to the event. Please be prepared to share some suggestions on the specific questions to be asked from the moderator, focusing on the experiences and perspectives of your country and region before or during the briefing with the moderator.

 

15:20:  Interactive dialogue by the panel, moderator to guide and be provocative as required.

 

[first round of discussion: moderator asks each (or most?) panel members Question 1, leading over to a more open dialogue around initial responses with others on the panel or the audience.]

 

Question 1: Experiences:

[to be modified for each country/region]

Mr/Ms Xxx – can you tell us what is the situation in [country / region]:  In your view, what are the key areas – and challenges – to strengthen the contribution of forests to the SDGs?

Question 1 – Key challenges to strengthen the contribution of forests to the SDGs in a coherent and effective way jointly with agriculture and fisheries sectors

Individual Panel Member Statement (2-3 minutes):

The 17 Sustainable Development Goals and 169 targets are integrated and balance the three dimensions of sustainable development. There are deep interconnections and many cross-cutting elements across the Goals and targets. We are all aware of the importance of forests in meeting the Sustainable Developments Goals and the importance of taking a cross-sectoral approach. The need to sustainably manage forests is clearly stated in SDG 15, and in the SDG 6 target on protecting and restoring water-related ecosystems. Moreover, due to their multi-functionality, forests have a role to play in achieving several of the other SDGs, including especially those related to ending poverty, achieving food security, promoting sustainable agriculture, ensuring access to sustainable energy for all, and combating climate change.

 

A growing world population increases the demands and the pressure on land; and the limited availability of natural resources will require more sustainable production and consumption resulting in degradation or conversion of land. The world’s population is predicted to increase to 9 billion people by 2050. In this regard growth in the agriculture, forestry and the fisheries sectors are one of the most effective means of reducing poverty and achieving food security. Sustainable development requires the development of technical, governance and financing frameworks for the broad range of local needs and contexts. To increase the productivity, there is a need for innovative approaches to conserve natural resources.

 

The significant role of forests in achieving the SDGs was highlighted at the “XIV World Forestry Congress” and in Durban Decleration the Congress emphasized the role of the integrated approaches to land use and economic, social and environmental benefits of integrating forests with agriculture.

 

The desertification and erosion combating efforts are in interaction with the impacts of agricultural activities on agricultural land resources. As the convertion of the forest land to agriculture is the most significant driver of global deforestation, improving the cross-sectoral cooperation between agriculture and forestry is inevitable to halt deforestation and forest degradation. Food security, nutrition and sustainable agriculture has also interactions with water efficiency, land degradation, gender equality, and governance. The safe management of the forest resource is also needed to ensure that fish and other water fauna have suitable habitat. Without forests; temperatures rise and evaporation rates from soil and water increase, contributing to wetland loss, land degradation and desertification.

 

To deliver multiple benefits from land; sectoral approaches need to be sustainable while integrated approaches need to be enhanced. Therefore sustainable production requires integrated approaches taking into consideration of trade-offs between services and beneficiaries through multi-stakeholder processes. Implementing integrated landscape management will lead to optimize the roles of agriculture, forests and other land uses and to maximize the synergies among them.

 

Institutional and governance concerns are believed to be among the most severe obstacles to implementing more integrated approaches to land use. That gives a crucial role to Governments to overcome this problem. Establishing and maintaining effective multi-stakeholder platforms, integrating sectoral policies and building proper governance arrangements across sectors must be the major priorities of the policymakers. Also sharing knowledge from different land-use sectors and linking research to policy must be facilitated.

 

We need to highlight more the role of forests on climate change, improving food security and livelihoods and the importance of integrating forests and other land uses which deserves greater recognition at the national, regional and international levels.

 

Please inform the session organizer on any suggested amendments or further specifications on the question for your country or region asap (email: Ewald.Rametsteiner@fao.org)

 

Moderator to make a short summary of points/topics collected, leading to the second topic.

 

16:10:  Interactive dialogue by the panel, moderator to guide and be provocative as required.

 

[second round of discussion: moderator asks each (or most?) panel members Question 2, leading over to a more open dialogue around initial responses with others on the panel or the audience.]

 

Question 2: Vision on the way forward towards sustainability:

[to be modified for each country/region]

Mr/Ms Xxx how would you describe a vision on the way forward towards sustainability – and the role of forests – for your country or region?  What is the potential to contribute to leading a transformative change towards sustainability jointly with agriculture and fisheries?

 

Individual Panel Member Statement (2-3 minutes):

The inter-related nature of the SDGs forces us to a new way of thinking, building new partnerships and common approach of forestry, agriculture and fisheries. To work together; we need to build a common understanding for sustainable development between these sectors starting with creating a strengthened dialogue. Establishing coordination mechanisms and building capacities for formulation, management and monitoring of the SDGs by the Governments would facilitate all these efforts. Also there is a need for collaboration at the regional level especially dealing with the transboundary issues and exchanging best practices.

 

National targets related with the Goals under 2030 Agenda takes into account different baseline conditions, capacities and levels of development and national priorities. Mainly the government authorities responsible for forestry has to take the lead in determining the national targets under Goal 15. There is also a need for cross-sectoral dialogue to guarantee integrated and comprehensive implementation of SDGs. Especially cross-sectoral dialogue between the Ministries responsible for agriculture, forestry and environment is essential for the integrated and comprehensive implementation of SDGs and achieving the goals. In this regard all Ministries and institutions should align their policies and programmes with integrating the SDG targets. There is a need to build strong cooperation, linkages and balances among the poicies between the Ministries of agriculture and forestry especially when dealing with the challenges like rural poverty, environmental sustainability in food systems and land degredation, under the related goals and targets of the 2030 Agenda.

 

Taking into account different national realities, capacities and levels of development; each country faces specific challenges to achieve sustainable development and has primary responsibility for its own economic and social development. For instance Turkey takes “the governance and strong institutions” as the 4th pillar of sustainable development. Without them, it is considered as impossible to realize goals and targets. Therefore, partnerships for capacity building and empowering respective instuitions have a high priority among all.

 

The high consistency between SDGs and the Development Plans of the countries should also be ensured. As a starting point, a stocktaking analysis of priority SDG targets and its relevant indicators could be used to assess the progress on SDGs, which will will reveal the focus areas and indicate where to start.

 

The key reason behind the success of the SDGs will be the issue of high level political ownership and commitments. Therefore strong monitoring of SDGs becomes crucial. Taking into account the more broad agenda of SDGs, political ownership will be more crucial for ensuring to integrate, implement and monitor the national SDG agenda. Additionally, the cooperation among all stakeholders to follow up the outcomes is vital for successful implementation of the Agenda.

 

The importance of taking into considireration the trends and roles of the forestry and fisheries sectors, particularly their contribution to sustainable management of natural resources and the achievement of the SDGs were underlined and taken as a priority for FAO’s work in the Europe and Central Asia Region, during the “30th Session of FAO Regional Conference for Europe” which was organized in Antalya two months ago. During the Conference; trends in the region concerning rural poverty and migration, farm structure, sustainability of food production and food systems and nutrition were noted. It was also highlighted that sustainable land use, protection of biodiversity and education and training are the important areas for achieving the SDGs. The roles of research and innovation, exchange of knowledge and experience, capacity development in the sector and to involve and consider the women and youth in implementing SDGs were stressed. Tackling food losses, trade and mobilization of the private sector and civil society were emphasized as important means to implement the Agenda 2030.

 

One of the important achievements of this Regional Conference was encouraging close cooperation between the agriculture, forestry and the fisheries regional commissions of FAO in Europe. In this regard, it was decided also to use the results of the discussions and recommendations stemming from forestry and fisheries regional commissions like the agriculture regional commission; for preperation of the topics of the FAO – Regional Conference for Europe (ERC) for policy discussion and adoption as well as preperation of the priorities for the region.

 

FAO’s mandate and strategic objectives are closely connected with SDGs. As the forests are fundamental for food security, we give great importance to FAO’s efforts of achieving food security and working with member countries to assist them through capacity building and policy advice in achieving SDGs targets in line with its Strategic Work. The strengthened cooperation between the FAO bodies of forestry, agriculture and fisheries will have positive implications on these responsibilities. Finally, FAO needs to take active role for strengthening the contributions of forests to the SDGs by making available data and information needed for the follow up and review system, providing technical support and promoting best practices and dialogue.

 

Regional and subregional frameworks has a potential to facilitate the effective translation of sustainable development policies into concrete action at national level. We have a strong cooperation in our region between FAO, UNECE, Forest Europe the European Forest Institute and other relevant regional organizations which helps to strengthen synergies and avoid overlaps. FAO European Forestry Commission and UNECE Committee on Forests and Forest Industry have a sixty-year old partnership agreement and an “Integrated Programme of Work” reflecting the needs and priorities of member countries.

 

We need to manage the all risks of the sector, emphasize the role of ecosystem services and facilitate the access to needed information and technologies. Values of the natural resources and ecosystem services need be calculated and be considered in policy making and implementation processes. The priorities should be the efficient use of land and water resources and overseeing the balance between protection and utilization of natural resources. Measuring the ecosystem services provided by forests is not so easy, but it is crucial to compare the gains and losses regarding land use change.

 

 

Please inform the session organizer on any suggested amendments or further specifications on the question for your country or region asap (email: Ewald.Rametsteiner@fao.org)

 

Moderator to make a short summary of points/topics collected by moderator, leading over to the closing remarks.

 

16:55:  Closing remarks (ADG, René Castro)

 

17:00:  End of High Level Dialogue

 

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact Ewald.Rametsteiner@fao.org

****************************************

Annex: Panelist’s bio:

 

1.      The Honourable Prof. Judi Wangalwa Wakhungu

  • is Cabinet Secretary (Minister) for Environment, and Natural Resources since 25 April 2013. Prior to joining the Kenya Cabinet in 2013, Prof Judi Wakhungu was the Executive Director of the African Center for Technology Studies (ACTS) in Nairobi, Kenya. She has been an Associate Professor of Science, Technology, and Society at Pennsylvania State University where she also served as the Director of the Women in the Sciences & Engineering (WISE) Institute. She has also served as an Energy Advisor to the Energy Sector Management Program of World Bank and Advisor at the Legatum Centre at MIT. Prof Wakhungu was the first woman geologist in the Ministry of Energy and Regional Development, where her duties entailed exploring for geothermal energy in Kenya’s Rift Valley. Prof. Wakhungu was also the first female petroleum geologist in the National Oil Corporation of Kenya. She was also the first female faculty member in the Department of Geology at the University of Nairobi. Prof. Wakhungu received a B.S. in geology from St. Lawrence University in New York, a M.S. degree in petroleum geology from Acadia University in Nova Scotia, Canada, and her Ph.D. in energy resources management from Pennsylvania State University. Her research interests include energy resources management; materials; energy policy and development; science, technology, and development; and gender issues in science and technology policy. She has served on many boards and committees, both nationally and internationally. She was the Research Director of the Global Energy Policy and Planning Program of the International Federation of Institutes for Advanced Study (IFIAS), which is based in Toronto, Canada. She has served as the Project Leader of the Renewable Energy Technology Dissemination Project of the Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI). Prof. Wakhungu also has the distinction of being the “designated energy expert” for the United Nations Commission of Science and Technology for Development (Gender Working Group). She has also served as the Executive Director of the African Technology Policy Studies (ATPS) Network.ng Judi W. Wakhungu is a former Executive Director of the African Technology Studies Network. She then became the Director of the Women in Sciences and Engineering (WISE) Institute at the Pennsylvania State University. She was also an Associate Professor of Science, Technology and Society whose research interests included Energy Policy and Development, Science Technology and Development, and Gender Issues in Science and Technology Policy. She received a B.S. in Geology from St. Lawrence University in New York, an MS degree in Petroleum Geology from Acadia University in Nova Scotia, Canada, and her Ph.D. in Energy Resources Management from Pennsylvania State University. She has held a number of energy sector positions in the civil service industry and higher education in her native country of Kenya. She was the first woman to be hired a9-s a geologist in the Ministry of Energy and Regional Development, where her duties entailed exploring for geothermal energy in Kenya’s Rift Valley, the first woman petroleum geologist in the National Oil Corporation of Kenya, as well as the first female faculty member in the Department of Geology at the University of Nairobi. She has served on many national and international boards and committees with the distinction of being the “designated energy expert” for the United Nations Commission of Science and Technology for Development (Gender Working Group). She is currently First Cabinet Secretary, Ministry for Environment, Water and Natural Resources of Kenya. In 2013, Prof. Wakhungu was among twenty-six eminent scientists, representing natural, social and human sciences and engineering, appointed to a Scientific Advisory Board, announced by the UN Secretary-General, Ban Ki-moon.

 

2.      Hon Susil Premajayantha.

 

  • Senior Cabinet Minister and former Minister of Environment and Renewable Energy, Sri Lanka.

 

3.      Ms Fabiola Munoz Dodero

  • is the Executive Director of Peru’s National Forest and Wildlife Service (SERFOR), under the Ministry of Agriculture and Irrigation. Prior to this, she was the Deputy Director of the Peru Forest Initiative, the U.S. Forest Service Cooperation Programme in Peru. A lawyer by profession, she has held a number of key roles in both private and public sectors, for example as adviser to the Minister of Agriculture. Her experience spans international cooperation and interagency coordination, natural resource management policies, social development linking the private and public sectors and environmental management. Ms. Muñoz-Dodero has strong interests in social policy, gender issues, and intercultural perspectives. She has also worked in academia, specifically in the design and implementation of training modules and courses with interdisciplinary and multi-cultural approaches and has consulted for national and international institutions.

 

4.      Mr İsmail Belen,

  • Chief Expert of Forest and Water Affaires, a Forest Engineer by training.  He has also Master Degree on Natural Resources and Public Management. He attended several international educational program including Senior Managers in Government of Harvard University. In Turkey, he worked at the field as Forest Ranger face to face with local people and workers. Then he served as Head of Department, Deputy Director General and Chief of the Cabinet to the Minister. Recently he works as “Chief Expert on Forests and Water Affaires” At international level he worked for several projects at Europe, Central Asia, Middle East and Africa. He involved to FAO, UNFF, Forest Europe, UNCDD, UNFCCC, UNECE negotiations as part of Turkish Delegation. He worked as the Vice Chair of European Forestry Commission. Since 2012, he has been the Chair of Mediterranean Forestry Questions-Silva Mediterranea, a statutory body of FAO with 28 member countries including European Union.

 

5.      Mr Glenn Mason

 

  • is the Assistant Deputy Minister of the Canadian Forest Service (CFS), Natural Resources Canada (NRCan). Glenn joined NRCan in 2011, as Director General, Policy, Economics and Industry Branch, CFS. Prior to that, he was Director of Strategic Operations for the Social Development Policy Secretariat in the Privy Council Office (PCO), where he was responsible for supporting the Social Policy Committee of Cabinet, and the health, aboriginal and justice/public safety portfolios, which earned him the Clerk’s Award for Policy Excellence. Before joining PCO, Glenn was the Director of Strategy at Human Resources Development Canada. Previously, he worked at PCO Intergovernmental Affairs, covering western Canada and NWT. In the 1990s, Glenn worked at Transport Canada on governance and commercialisation reforms within the domestic marine sector. Glenn later worked for three years at the Ministry of Finance in Georgetown, Guyana, implementing budgeting reforms to enhance their national financial management system. Glenn serves on the Boards of FPInnovations, one of the world’s largest private, non-profit research centres working in forest research, the Canadian Interagency Forest Fire Centre, and the Forest History Society. He also serves in an advisory capacity on the external Advisory Councils for the Faculties of Forestry at the University of Toronto and the University of British Columbia. Glenn holds a M.A. in Development Economics from the Institute of Social Studies, The Hague, a B.A. (Hons) in Political Science from the University of Western Ontario, and a Diploma in economic history from the London School of Economics, and is a graduate of the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology. Glenn lives in Gatineau, Québec with his wife and two children and is an avid photographer and hockey dad.

Letters for Future